Hampstead – Review (Netflix)

I have lived in London, the United Kingdom, all of my life. Born and bred here, you would think that I would know life here quite well. Growing up and around lower-middle-class people and having moved towards middle-class in adulthood, with a glimpse of the upper-middle-classes, I feel that I have a pretty good knowledge of the lives of Londoners, regardless of their social status.

Otherhood – Review (Netflix)

I am beginning to think I watch too many films. I remember thinking the same thing about the late and venerable Barry Norman, film critic on the BBC’s Film from 1972 to 1998. He was a veritable font of film knowledge and sometimes this knowledge would make him seem jaded, bored by the repetitiousness on view.

White Chamber – Review (Netflix)

Paul Raschid grew up around filmmaking. His father, Neville, a producer, obviously had young Paul around the good and the great of British film from a young age. Perhaps he was even around international film, who knows, I am speculating, guessing. According to his IMDB profile, he studied film, along with English literature, at King’s College. If only he had decided to write a book instead of making films. Let me explain.

The Laws Of Thermodynamics – Review​ (Netflix)

It is a truism that, generally, a person likes to believe themselves to be right. That is not to say that their every utterance is correct or that they are never wrong. No, it more relates to what they believe, what their guiding principals are. One tends to embrace beliefs that make them feel safe and that reinforce their view of the world.

Rim of the World – review (Netflix)

Spoiler territory: Alex (Jack Gore) is a nerdy, thirteen-year-old recluse, obsessed with all things space-related. His mother, Grace (Annabeth Gish) signs him up for a summer camp, Rim of the World, to try and get him involved with other kids after the death of his father.

Father Of The Year – review (Netflix)

Ben (Joey Bragg) and his best friend, Larry (Matt Shively) go to visit Ben’s layabout, wastrel of a father, Wayne (David Spade). Ben is a college valedictorian and is leaving for New York, having got a job at a progressive, tech company, ISG. Ben is not overly excited to see his father, only doing so out of duty. Wayne shows himself to be as much of a loser as Ben believes. 

Game Over, Man! – review (Netflix)

Alexxx (Adam Devine), Darren (Anders Holm) and Joel (Blake Anderson) work in The Level hotel as a housekeeping team. They dream of being wealthy and have an idea for a video game. Alexxx keeps coming up with ridiculous ideas, Joel is a closest homosexual and Darren is a drug addict who gets his fixes from Alexxx. Alexxx, unbeknown to his two friends, lives in the hotel. 

Day of the Dead: Bloodline – review (Netflix)

So it was about time for me to watch another horror effort on Netflix. Even though there are well-known horror films on there, I tend to watch the lesser-known films, of all genres, and in various languages. Today, I decided to watch an English speaking effort called Day of the Dead: Bloodline, a remake, a homage to George A. Romero’s original 1985 film, Day of the Dead.