Fractured – review (Netflix)

Brief synopsis: Driving back from a family gathering, visiting his wife, Joanne’s, parents, Ray stops off to allow their daughter to use the bathroom. Whilst at the rest stop, their daughter, Perri gets frightened by a dog and falls, injuring her arm. Ray takes her to the local hospital and the mother and daughter get taken for a scan. Ray goes to the waiting area and falls asleep. When he wakes up he goes looking for his wife and daughter, the reception has no record of his daughter. The only record they have is for him being admitted earlier in the day. Ray tries to find his family.

A.M.I – review (Netflix)

Brief synopsis: After suffering brain trauma in a car accident that killed her mother, high school student Cassie obsesses over her American football playing boyfriend, Liam. Lonely and missing her mother, she finds a phone with an AI that replicates her mother’s voice. Cassie’s tenuous grasp on reality is tested further as the AI pushes her to homicidal heights.

Dead In a Week (Or Your Money Back) – review (Netflix)

Brief Synopsis William is a depressed young writer who only thinks of death and killing himself. A chance encounter, when trying for the umpteenth time to commit suicide, with an ageing assassin, Leslie, results in him hiring the aged killer. Leslie promises to fulfil the contract within the week. When William receives a call from a publisher saying they are interested in his book, a meeting with one of the company’s editor’s, Ellie, has him rethinking his desire to die.

Hampstead – Review (Netflix)

I have lived in London, the United Kingdom, all of my life. Born and bred here, you would think that I would know life here quite well. Growing up and around lower-middle-class people and having moved towards middle-class in adulthood, with a glimpse of the upper-middle-classes, I feel that I have a pretty good knowledge of the lives of Londoners, regardless of their social status.

Otherhood – Review (Netflix)

I am beginning to think I watch too many films. I remember thinking the same thing about the late and venerable Barry Norman, film critic on the BBC’s Film from 1972 to 1998. He was a veritable font of film knowledge and sometimes this knowledge would make him seem jaded, bored by the repetitiousness on view.

White Chamber – Review (Netflix)

Paul Raschid grew up around filmmaking. His father, Neville, a producer, obviously had young Paul around the good and the great of British film from a young age. Perhaps he was even around international film, who knows, I am speculating, guessing. According to his IMDB profile, he studied film, along with English literature, at King’s College. If only he had decided to write a book instead of making films. Let me explain.

The Laws Of Thermodynamics – Review​ (Netflix)

It is a truism that, generally, a person likes to believe themselves to be right. That is not to say that their every utterance is correct or that they are never wrong. No, it more relates to what they believe, what their guiding principals are. One tends to embrace beliefs that make them feel safe and that reinforce their view of the world.

Rim of the World – review (Netflix)

Spoiler territory: Alex (Jack Gore) is a nerdy, thirteen-year-old recluse, obsessed with all things space-related. His mother, Grace (Annabeth Gish) signs him up for a summer camp, Rim of the World, to try and get him involved with other kids after the death of his father.