All Is Well – review (Netflix)

  Janne (Aenne Schwarz) and Piet (Andreas Dohler) are a couple of thirty-something, struggling writers. They are planning to move out of the city and are doing up an old house. Janne meets an old friend, Robert (Tilo Nest), who owns a publishing company. He offers her a job as an editor. She tells him she will think about it. She meets Sissi (Lisa Haigmeister), Robert’s young wife, and her brother, Martin (Hans Lôw) briefly.

No Estoy Loco -review (Netflix)

  Carolina (Paz Bascuñán) is woken up on her thirty-eighth birthday by her husband, Fernando (Marcial Tagle) with breakfast in bed and the gift of a new car. He even buys her a couple of tickets for a cruise around the Greek Islands, though he does stipulate that he has bought them so as she could go away with a friend. Though she is appreciative of his attention, she finds his kindness a little strange. 

Devil At The Crossroads – review

Even though slavery was abolished in the United States in 1865, the effects and influence of it still persisted over the next hundred years and beyond. Though slavery was abolished, many opposed the freedom of black people, some violently so, giving rise to the Ku Klux Klan, a pro-white resistance group formed in the deep South in 1866. 

Name That Theme Tune

With the explosion of streaming services, media, and bingeable or downloadable content shows that are watched by the masses are rare. The like of Games of Thrones or Walking Dead—both which I do not watch—are not as common as they were in the seventies, eighties and into the nineties.

Turn Up Charlie – review (Netflix)

IS Idris Elba James Brown in disguise? Even though the erstwhile godfather of soul was known as the hardest working man in show business, his death in 2006 put an end to his hard-working practices and brilliant music career. His spirit, however, seems to have found its way into the ever-prolific Elba.

Big Boys With All The Toys

I was speaking with a friend of mine who is in the film and television industry. He is lucky and personable enough to always be in demand for his directing talents. The last few years have been busy for him, with a long cherished project coming to completion and various television jobs. He also directed a comedic feature, whilst hawking around another biopic project. This is a man who keeps busy. With the various platforms and streaming services available all needing content, a man such as he is, can, without too much of a herculean effort, keep themselves in demand, as he has done. As grateful and happy as he is to be a working director, the film industry still remains a source of frustration.

No Damn Idea Why

The more I learn about filmmaking the less sure I am. I know that a good or excellent script is a basic requirement, it being the blueprint for any journey into filmmaking, but can any film lover honestly say they have not watched a film, with a less than stellar script, that has not only been enjoyable but become a hit? Conversely, I have seen brilliantly scripted films, with creditable performances, gain no traction whatsoever.

Don’t Speak

Ah Ms Banks, you really ought to check the filmography of those whose careers before you decide to besmirch the name of a director, especially a white, Jewish, industry heavyweight like Spielberg. There has been in Hollywood over the past couple of years a real push for more prominent roles for women and any race that isn't white. That this is a thing in a country where a black man can start his own self-sustaining film industry - Tyler Perry - or a woman can, as far back as the sixties - Lucille Ball - run a television studio, is a little odd to a black person looking on from the United Kingdom as the U. S. was always the place to look for any sort cultural and ‘people like us’ references.