Rattlesnake – review (Netflix)

Brief Synopsis: A single mother, Katrina, takes her young daughter, Clara, to start a new life across America. As she is driving, she gets a puncture and is forced to stop and try and change the tyre. Whilst Katrina struggles to change the tyre, Clara goes playing in the dusty lands. Clara gets bitten by a rattlesnake, her screams causing Katrina to come running. Katrina seeks assistance in a nearby motorhome.

A.M.I – review (Netflix)

Brief synopsis: After suffering brain trauma in a car accident that killed her mother, high school student Cassie obsesses over her American football playing boyfriend, Liam. Lonely and missing her mother, she finds a phone with an AI that replicates her mother’s voice. Cassie’s tenuous grasp on reality is tested further as the AI pushes her to homicidal heights.

Hell Fest – review (Netflix)

Brief synopsis: Natalie goes to meet up with her best friend from high school, Brooke, having been away at college. Another old high school colleague, Taylor, is living with Brooke. The three young women, plus their partners and would-be partners, go to Hell Fest, a horror-themed amusement park. At the park, Natalie sees one of the patrons get killed by a masked man, who she and the rest of the group thought was one of the park’s actors. When the same masked man begins to stalk them, the group realise that their lives are in danger.

Office Uprising – Review (Netflix)

Office Uprising is a comedy-horror written by Peter Gamble and Ian Shorr and directed by Lin Oeding. It scores a respectable six point two on IMDB with a great cast led by Brenton Thwaites, who is in the dark and highly entertaining Netflix series DC’s Titans as Nightwing/Dick Grayson. Jane Levy, best known for her turn as Tessa in Suburgatory, also stars, along with Karan Soni, who is recognisable from the Deadpool films as well as many other roles.

White Chamber – Review (Netflix)

Paul Raschid grew up around filmmaking. His father, Neville, a producer, obviously had young Paul around the good and the great of British film from a young age. Perhaps he was even around international film, who knows, I am speculating, guessing. According to his IMDB profile, he studied film, along with English literature, at King’s College. If only he had decided to write a book instead of making films. Let me explain.

Day of the Dead: Bloodline – review (Netflix)

So it was about time for me to watch another horror effort on Netflix. Even though there are well-known horror films on there, I tend to watch the lesser-known films, of all genres, and in various languages. Today, I decided to watch an English speaking effort called Day of the Dead: Bloodline, a remake, a homage to George A. Romero’s original 1985 film, Day of the Dead.  

Peelers – review (Netflix)

Ladies and gentleman, we have a contender. I have watched a lot of terrible films on Netflix, mostly, I tell myself, to review them. There is, of course, a perverse joy in watching terrible films, but there are some films that test even yours truly’s capacity for awful. 

The Haunting of Sharon Tate – review

The B-roll of Los Angeles at night is quite good and the title cards are accurate. These are the only positives I can find in the absolute abomination that is passing itself off as a film, The Haunting of Sharon Tate. Everything about the man behind the camera and story and script, Daniel Farrands’ - I refuse to call him a filmmaker, director or writer on the strength of this - project, is bad.