The Wrong Missy – review (Netflix)

Brief synopsis: After suffering a traumatic blind date experience, a single man encounters the woman of his dreams a few months later whilst on his way to a cross-state meeting. High jinx ensues when he mistakenly ends up asking the former blind date to accompany him on a work retreat instead of the woman of his dreams. Is it any good?: No. Fifty-two people have somehow managed to give this a six on IMDB. I can only believe that they all worked on the film. This film is shockingly bad and not particularly funny, a bare minimum for a comedy. I suppose it was always going to be a tall ask if you put David Spade in the lead role.

Surrounded – review (Netflix)

Brief synopsis: Paige Lewis, a video blogger, invites her sister, Lindsay, to join her adventure-seeking group on a dive near a remote rock in the ocean. Not wanting to be stopped by any authority, Paige enlists the help of a dubious pilot to take the group out. The plane they are on crashes into shark-infested waters. As a group of sharks picks them off one by one, only Lindsay is left to try and survive the ordeal.

Fanatic – review (Netflix)

Brief Synopsis: Rap superstar, Dom D takes advantage of his status and fandom, inviting voluptuous fan, Lexi, to his after-party. Dom D and Lexi hook up at the party. Five years later, Lexi hears Dom D is back in town. She goes to see him but is prevented from doing so by his security. Lexi kidnaps him.

White Chamber – Review (Netflix)

Paul Raschid grew up around filmmaking. His father, Neville, a producer, obviously had young Paul around the good and the great of British film from a young age. Perhaps he was even around international film, who knows, I am speculating, guessing. According to his IMDB profile, he studied film, along with English literature, at King’s College. If only he had decided to write a book instead of making films. Let me explain.

We Belong Together – review (Netflix​)

Tracy (Draya Michele) is released from incarceration. She decides to enroll in college. Thomas Lewis is a recovering alcoholic who is trying to get his life together after a divorce from his ex-wife, Megan (Elise Neal). Because of his alcoholism, Megan got custody of their daughter, Brittany (Cassidey Fralin), who he has not been allowed to see whilst recovering.

The Haunting of Sharon Tate – review

The B-roll of Los Angeles at night is quite good and the title cards are accurate. These are the only positives I can find in the absolute abomination that is passing itself off as a film, The Haunting of Sharon Tate. Everything about the man behind the camera and story and script, Daniel Farrands’ - I refuse to call him a filmmaker, director or writer on the strength of this - project, is bad.