Sniper: Ultimate Kills

The words ‘ultimate’ ‘sniper’ and ‘kill’ are very popular when it comes to creating film titles. Put any one of those words into the search bar on IMDB and a whole slew of variations pop up. It seems that many a filmmaker has the same idea as to what makes a good title. Or they’re just lazy. 

The Basement – a review

Only five minutes in and I can see why this film scored three point seven on IMDB. Might be some sort of a record. Generally, I don’t critique acting, because actors are at the mercy of the director, script and one another. Being an actor is hard. The competition is fierce, the rejection constant, the availability of good, paying, projects rare. 

The Lazarus Effect – review

Back in the late eighties, Peter Filardi wrote a screenplay that was started a mini bidding war. The story of medical students dying and bringing themselves back from the dead proved an enticing and intriguing premise, and Filardi’s Flatliners script was snapped up by Colombia pictures. 

Polar – a review

If you were to take John Wick film and splice it with Kill Bill 2, the bloodier of the two-parter, and it was directed by a Guy Richie protege, who hadn’t quite got the grasp of subtlety, you would get something close to Polar, the Netflix film starring Mads Mikkelsen, last seen opposite Benedict Cumberbatch’s Stephen Strange, in the MCU’s Doctor Strange, and Vanessa Hudgens, moving away from her Disney roots.

Between Worlds – review

Nicolas Cage is one of the most watchable actors of his generation. Part of the famous Coppola dynasty, Cage’s performances on screen have ranged from the extraordinary to the ludicrous and everything in-between. A veteran of nearly one hundred films, Cage’s role choices and approach to performance seem to reflect his wild and crazy life. 

Viking Destiny – review

Let’s talk about the title. Viking Destiny. Viking. Destiny. Not ‘A Viking’s Destiny’ or ‘Destiny of the Viking’. Viking Destiny. Is it about the destiny of the Viking people? Well, it sort of is. Let me explain, even if it does not explain, satisfactorily, the terrible title.

Agatha and the Truth of Murder – review

Florence Nightingale Shore (Stacha Hicks) takes a train journey and is bludgeoned by a strange man after a brief conversation. She died four days later.      Desperate to get over her writer’s block, Agatha Christie (Ruth Bradley) goes to see Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Michael McElhatton) whilst he is in the midst of a golf game. He tells her that to get over his own writer’s block, he designed a golf course. 

Alien Warfare – a review (Netflix)

  It was calling me. When a film registers two point four on IMDB, it is begging to be reviewed. Begging I tell ya! The opening credits, which looked like they were knocked up on a budget PC, are woeful. They are, mercifully, short. Unfortunately, the film begins. Whoa, it’s terrible. I am writing this as I watch the film and it’s painful.